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Writing, Citing, Tutoring, and Studying Resources: Chicago

CMOS Online

Chicago Citation Examples, 17th ed: Author/Date with Reference List

Here are some examples of how to document sources using the Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) Author/Date method, which is suggested for social and natural sciences. More examples are available on their Quick Guide: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html. T

Please note: the current edition of the Chicago Manual of Style no longer requires access dates for electronic sources unless no date of publication or revision is available from the source (p. 657).

For citations in text, the general form is (Author Date). Journal articles often list many authors, especially in the sciences. If there are four or more authors, list up to ten in the reference list; in the text, list only the first, followed by et al. (“and others”). For more than ten authors (not shown here), list the first seven in the reference list, followed by et al.

An Article from an Online Database:

(Hoquet 2016)

Hoquet, Thierry. 2016. "What Does It Mean to be Central? A Botanical Geography of Paris 1830-1848." Journal of the History of Biology 49 no.1: 191-230. doi: 10.1007/s10739-015-9416-5.

If no DOI is available, use the URL from accessing the article or (if applicable) use the name of the database from which it was retrieved in place of the DOI.  Retrieval dates are not necessary. 

An Article from a Print Journal:

(Peck and Sheldon 2008, 201) [to cite a specific page]

Peck, Kirk, and Sheldon Stick. 2008. "Catholic and Jesuit Identity in Higher Education." Christian Higher Education 7, no. 3: 200-225.

An Article from an Online Newspaper or News Service:

(Mayneris 2020)

Mayneris, Florian. “Why Canada Needs the United States to Fight the Coronavirus.” Canadian Press, April 13, 2020. https://theconversation.com/why-canada-needs-the-united-states-to-fight-the-coronavirus-135657

A Book:

(Gladwell 2019)

Gladwell, Malcolm. 2019. Talking to Strangers: What we Should Know About the People we Don't Know. New York: Little, Brown and Company.

A Chapter from an Edited Book:

(Chang 2015, 30) [to cite a specific page]

ChangClaudia. 2015. The Study of Nomads in the Republic of Kazahkstan. In The Ecology of Pastoralism, edited by P. Nick Kardulias17-40Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado. 

A Web Site:

(Litan and Fleming 2021)

Litan, Robert E. and John Fleming. 2021. "The Climate Wolf at the Door: Why and How Climate Resilience Should be Central to Building Back Better." Brookings Institution. https://www.brookings.edu/research/the-climate-wolf-at-the-door-why-and-how-climate-resilience-should-be-central-to-building-back-better/.  

If no date use n.d.

 

Chicago Citation Examples 17th ed. Notes with Bibliography

Here are some examples of how to document sources using the Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.) Humanities method, which is suggested for literature, history, and the arts. More examples are available on their Quick Guide: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html. The complete Manual is available online for the Regis community on this page.

Using this method of documentation requires notes (either footnotes or endnotes) and may include a bibliography.  If the bibliography is limited to only those sources used in the paper, the notes may follow the short form. Using a selective bibliography (with only some sources listed) or no bibliography at all requires the full version of the note (listed first in each example). If you wish to cite a specific section, your note (short or long) should include only the page number(s) for the cited material.  The complete page range for articles and book chapters is included in the bibliographic entry. The current edition of the Chicago Manual of Style no longer requires access dates for electronic sources unless no date of publication or revision is available from the source (p. 657).  Please consult your professor about the expectations for your paper's notes and bibliography.  Also, please note that many disciplines have modified the Chicago style for their own needs (e.g., music).  You may be required to consult additional sources to see examples of those modifications.  Again, your professor is the best source of information for citation requirements.

An Article from an Online Database:

Note:
   1. Molly C. Ott and Lindsey K. Dippold. "Adjunct Employment Preference: Who Wants to Be Full-Time Faculty?" Community College Journal  of  Research and Practice 42, no. 3 (2018): 190-203, https://doi.org/10.1080/10668926.2017.1283259.

Short form:

   1. Ott and Dippold, "Adjunct Employment Preference," 195.

Bibliography:

Ott, Molly C. and Dippold, Lindsey K. "Adjunct Employment Preference: Who Wants to Be Full-Time Faculty?" Community College Journal of    Research and Practice 42, no. 3 (2018): 190-203. https://doi.org/10.1080/10668926.2017.1283259.

If no DOI is available, use the URL from accessing the article or (if applicable) use the name of the database from which it was retrieved in place of the DOI.  Retrieval dates are not necessary. 

An Article from a Print Journal:

Note:

   3. Robin Zheng, "Precarity Is a Feminist Issue: Gender and Contingent Labor in the Academy," Hypatia 33, no. 2 (2018): 235-55.

Short form:

   3. Zheng, "Precarity Is a Feminist Issue," 240.

Bibliography:

Zheng, Robin. "Precarity Is a Feminist Issue: Gender and Contingent Labor in the Academy." Hypatia 33, no. 2 (2018): 235-55.

An Article from an Online Newspaper or News Service:

Note:

   13. Emily Anthes, "The Next Trick: Pulling Coronavirus Out of Thin Air," New York Times, March 24, 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/24/health/coronavirus-testing-airborne-aerosol-indoor.html.

Short form:

   13. Anthes, "The Next Trick."

Bibliography:

Anthes, Emily. "The Next Trick: Pulling Coronavirus out of Thin Air," New York Times, March 24, 2021. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/24/health/coronavirus-testing-airborne-aerosol-indoor.html.

A Book:

Note:

   7. Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, The Undocumented Americans (New York: One World, 2020), 47.

Short form:

   7. Cornejo Villavicenc, The Undocumented Americans, 47.

Bibliography:

Cornejo Villavicencio, Karla. The Undocumented Americans. New York: One World, 2020.

A Chapter from an Edited Book:

Note:

   32. Lalla Essaydi, "Gender, Power, Tradition," in Islamic Art : Past, Present, Future, edited by Jonathon Bloom and Shelia Blair (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2019), 91.

Short form:

   32. Essaydi, "Gender, Power, Tradition," 92.

Bibliography:

Essaydi, Lalla. "Gender, Power, Tradition," In Islamic Art : Past, Present, Future, edited by Jonathon Bloom and Shelia Blair, 85-103. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2019.

An Ebook:

Note:

7.  Nico Orlandi, The Innocent Eye : Why Vision Is Not a Cognitive Process (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), 35, https://search-ebscohost-com.dml.regis.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=cat08285a&AN=rul.b1615574&site=eds-live&scope=site.

Short form:

Orlandi, The Innocent Eye, 51.

Bibliography:

Orlandi, Nico. The Innocent Eye : Why Vision Is Not a Cognitive Process.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. https://search-ebscohost-com.dml.regis.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=cat08285a&AN=rul.b1615574&site=eds-live&scope=site.

A Web Site:
[include an access date if no publication date is available]

Note:

   14. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, "Rallying the Nation," accessed February 26, 2021, http://www

.ushmm.org/propaganda/themes/rallying-the-nation/.

Short Form:

   14. US Holocaust Memorial Museum, "Rallying the Nation."

Bibliography:

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Rallying the Nation." Accessed February 26, 2021. http://www

   .ushmm.org/propaganda/themes/rallying-the-nation/.

 An Online Primary Source from a Database:

Note:

   4. Charles Mason and Jerimiah Dixon, Journal of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, 11/15/1763 - 9/11/1768, DocTeach, National Archives Records Administration, accessed March 25, 2021, https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/1-journal-of-charles-mason-and-jeremiah-dixon.

Short form:

   4. Mason and Dixon, Journal.

Bibliography:

Mason, Charles and Jerimiah Dixon, Journal of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, 11/15/1763 - 9/11/1768,  DocTeach, National Archives Records Administration, accessed March 25, 2021. https://www.docsteach.org/documents/document/1-journal-of-charles-mason-and-jeremiah-dixon.

 A Musical Score:

Note:

   27. George Philipp Telemann, Sonata in G Major for Flute and Piano, in Four Sonatas for Flute and

Piano, ed. Milton Wittgenstein, 8. (New York: G. Schirmer, 1953).

Short form:

   27. Telemann, Sonata in G Major, 8.  

Bibliography:

Telemann, George Philipp. Sonata in G Major for Flute and Piano. In Four Sonatas for  Flute and Piano,

   ed. Milton Wittgenstein, 3-12. New York: G. Schirmer, 1953.

A Sound Recording from an Online Music Library:

Note:

   16. Carl Nielsen, Clarinet Concerto, Op. 57, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kees

Bakels, on Violin Concerto / Clarinet Concerto / Flute Concerto, Naxos 8.554189, accessed May 20, 2011,

http://regis.naxosmusiclibrary.com.

Short form:

   16. Nielsen, Clarinet Concerto.

Bibliography:

Nielsen, Carl. Clarinet Concerto, Op. 57. Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. Kees Bakels. On Violin

   Concerto / Clarinet Concerto / Flute Concerto. Naxos 8.554189. Accessed May 20, 2011.  http://regis

   .naxosmusiclibrary.com.

A Photograph from an Online Source:
[using shortened URL when original is unwieldy and search function is available]

Note:

   26. Edward S Curtis, photographer. Iahla, "Willow", Taos, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing right, 1905, photographic print, New Mexico, https://www.loc.gov/item/92519832/.

Short form:

   26. Curtis, "Iahla, "Willow."

Bibliography:

Curtis, Edward S. Iahla, "Willow", Taos, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing right, photographic print, 1905 (Library of Congress, Washington, DC).

   https://www.loc.gov/item/92519832/.

A Painting from a Book:

Note:

   5. Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair, 1940, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York,

in Contemporary Women Artists, edited by Laurie Collier Hillstrom and Kevin Hillstrom, (Detroit: St.

James Press, 1999), 334.

Short form:

   5. Kahlo, Self-Portrait.

Bibliography:

Kahlo, Frida. Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair, oil on canvas, 1940 (Museum of Modern Art, New York). In

   Contemporary Women Artists, edited by Laurie Collier Hillstrom and Kevin Hillstrom, 334. Detroit: St.

   James Press, 1999.

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